Wednesday, 6 May 2015

The Weird and Wonderful World of Animal Sex

8pm (doors 7.30pm)
Thursday 28 May 2015
£3 / £2 concessions.
The Vaults Bar, Dirty Dicks, 202 Bishopsgate, City of London EC2M 4NR
Bus / train / tube: Liverpool Street
Facebook event page

What’s the easiest way to tell species apart? Check their genitals. Researching private parts was long considered taboo, but scientists are now beginning to understand that the wild diversity of sex organs across species can tell us a lot about evolution. 

Menno Schilthuize invites the audience to join him as he uncovers the ways the shapes and functions of genitalia have been molded by complex Darwinian struggles: penises that have lost their spines but evolved appendages to displace sperm; female orgasms that select or reject semen from males, in turn subtly modifying the females’ genital shape. 

We learn why spiders masturbate into miniature webs, discover she-dungflies that store

sperm from attractive males in their bellies, and see how, when it comes to outlandish appendages and bizarre behaviors, humans are downright boring. 

Menno is the author of the book Nature's Nether Regions (Penguin) is senior scientist
at Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden, the Netherlands.

8pm (doors 7.30pm)
Thursday 28 May 2015
£3 / £2 concessions.
The Vaults Bar, Dirty Dicks, 202 Bishopsgate, City of London EC2M 4NR
Bus / train / tube: Liverpool Street

Tuesday, 5 May 2015

The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day

London Fortean Society in association with Conway Hall presents

The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day

David J Hand
This event has now sold out. 

Tuesday 19 May 2015
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn / Directions

The Improbability Principle: Why Coincidences, Miracles, and Rare Events Happen Every Day  event Facebook page.



Coincidences happen, incredibly unlikely things occur, and the apparently miraculous comes about. The improbability principle says that such extraordinarily improbable events are commonplace. It shows that this is not a contradiction, but that we should expect identical lottery numbers to come up more than once, lightning to strike twice, and financial crashes to occur.

Professor David J. Hand is Senior Research Investigator and Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Imperial College, London. His applications interests include psychology, physics, and the retail credit industry - he and his research group won the 2012 Credit Collections and Risk Award for Contributions to the Credit Industry. He was made OBE for services to research and innovation in 2013.

His latest book, The Improbability Principle, appeared in February 2014. 

This event has now sold out. 
Tuesday 19 May 2015
7.30pm
Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL
Tube: Holborn / Directions